ACES IN THEIR PLACES

Aces in their places is an idea that refers to leaders knowing the value of their people, the vision of the company, and the endeavors to bring out the best in both when filling positions (connectionculture.com). But, this blog is going to look at the value of people in a different way and change the idea of Aces in their places.  Because April is child abuse prevention month and because this blog is about empowering women, it is important to understand how we as a community of women can change the effects of childhood trauma.

ACES, if you have never heard of this acronym, stands for Adverse Childhood Experiences. ACES are traumatic events that happened in childhood. These events include violence, abuse, homes of substance abuse, and other traumatic experiences (CDC).  ACES can impact a person’s health and cause an increase in other risk factors. There are shocking statics all around about the impact of ACES. For instance, the CDC shared that after surveying adults in about 25 states, there were about 61% who experienced at least one ACES. Of this same group, there were about 1 in 6 people who experienced four or more ACES.

Although a person who has high ACES scores cannot change go back to change their childhood experiences, they can work to prevent ACES by implementing strategies they can use before becoming parents or have already begun their parenting journey and by implementing strategies to address those past traumas. Therefore, it is important to put ACES in their places through awareness, seeking help, changing habits, and reducing the possibility for high ACES scores for future generations and for the community.

To explain, the higher the ACES score, the more a person is at risk for experiencing long-term negative situations. This puts a person with higher scores at risk for diseases, poverty, toxic relationships, and psychological concerns such as suicide, addiction, and depression. The hope of putting ACES in their places relies on building resilience, seeking professional help, and gaining awareness.

If building resilience is the strategy that you are considering, Peoplesense Blog shared 8 ways to build resilience in the face of trauma. These ideas range from accepting what has happened to you, setting goals, and seeking professional help. Please visit this website for the complete list. If seeking professional help is the strategy that you are considering; and you do not where to start, try EAP (Employee Assistance Program) services through your employer, check-in with your insurance network to learn where to go for mental health treatment, join support groups. Different solutions may be to consult with your church Pastor or to advocate for community programs that may change or impact the well-being of your community. Finally, seek a life coaching service such as I See You Growing Life Coaching.

If you have never taken ACES and want to know your ACES score, please complete the tool and follow the instructions for scoring. If your score is greater than 4, the more you are at risk for the impact of adverse experiences.

As a way to put ACES in their places, a group of women, including myself completed the ACES Questionnaire to learn more about our ACES scores.

As you can see, there were a total of eight women who completed the ACES surveys-including myself. Since every single item is just as important as the next, a comparison will be made for each. For question one, there was a greater number of women who answered no to this question than yes. This means there were more of us in this group who did not experience this type of physical and emotional abuse. For question two, there was a greater number of women who answered no than yes. This means there were more of us in this group who did not experience this type of physical abuse. For question three, there was a greater number of women who answered no to this question than yes. This means there were more of us in this group who did not experience this type of sexual abuse. For question four, there was a greater number of women who answered yes than no. This means there were more of us in this group who experienced this type of emotional neglect. For question five, there was a greater number of women who answered no than yes. This means there were more of us in this group who did not experience this type of physical neglect. For question six, there was a greater number of women who answered yes than no. This means there were more of us in this group who had one or more parents absent in their lives. For question seven, there was a greater number of women who answered no than yes. This means all of us in this group did not experience this type of trauma. For question eight, there was a greater number of women who answered no than yes. That means there were more of us in this group who did not experience this type of household mental illness. For question nine, there was a greater number of women who answered no than yes. This means there were more of in this group who did not witness this type of mental illness. Finally, for question 10, there was a greater number of women who answered no than yes. This means there were more of us who did not experience this type of trauma.

For information on how we as a community can work collectively to prevent ACES and to reduce its impact, please look at the following video from the CDC.

Thank you for taking this journey with me in embracing change, expecting growth, and empowering you.

References:

Preventing Adverse Childhood Experiences. CDC https://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/aces/fastfact.html

8 Ways to Build Resilience in the Face of Trauma. Anya Stephens

https://www.peoplesense.com.au/newsarticle

For the Best Teams, Put Aces in Their Places. Paul LaRue

https://www.connectionculture.com/post/for-the-best-teams-put-aces-in-their-places

2 thoughts on “ACES IN THEIR PLACES

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s